The Latest: Longer poll hours in some South Dakota counties

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — The Latest on South Dakota’s primary election (all times local):

12:45 p.m.

The Secretary of State’s office says intermittent loss of connectivity with electronic poll books has caused voting delays in Pennington and Hughes counties and will require some polling places to stay open later during the primary election.

The office said Tuesday the counties are deciding which polling places will extend hours beyond 7 p.m. local time. Officials say the issue affected eight counties that use electronic poll books, but it has been resolved.

The counties are: Brookings, Brown, Hughes, Hyde, Pennington, Potter, Sully and Yankton. Officials say some counties started using paper voter registration lists and poll books, while others resolved the issues with the electronic poll book vendor.

Pennington County Auditor Julie Pearson says some polling places will stay open later to accommodate delays, which for some polls were nearly two hours long.

Republican primary voters are picking a nominee for governor and a candidate for a statewide congressional seat, among other races.

11:50 a.m.

Computer issues have meant longer-than-usual wait times for voters in South Dakota’s Brown County.

Election workers are trying to keep the lines moving for Tuesday’s primary election.

Brown County Auditor Maxine Fischer tells the Aberdeen American News that people are voting but “it just takes time to look up the names.”

Poll workers have to do the work manually because the computer system used to scan driver’s licenses and find the correct ballot has been down at times. When voters arrive, election workers are taking their names and going upstairs to check them on the auditor’s computer system.

Ten different ballots are being used Tuesday in Brown County, which is having votes for school board, Aberdeen City Council and South Dakota’s partisan primary.

Elections officials say issues with electronic poll books caused delays at several primary voting locations across South Dakota.

Pennington County Auditor Julie Pearson says voting resumed after paper poll books were delivered to the locations involved, including Rapid City. Officials did not immediately say how many locations are involved.

The Rapid City Journal says some Rapid City residents were unable to vote early because of the computer problems. Pearson says polling locations with problems are expected to remain open beyond the 7 p.m. usual closing.

Republican primary voters are picking a nominee for governor and a candidate for a statewide congressional seat, among other races.

Republicans are choosing between Attorney General Marty Jackley and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem in the governor’s race.

The choice for the GOP’s congressional candidate is between former Public Utilities commissioner Dusty Johnson, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio.

Polls are open in South Dakota where Republican primary voters are picking a nominee for governor and a candidate for a statewide congressional seat, among other.

Voters went to the polls early Tuesday under sunny skies and temperatures in the 60s. Republicans are choosing between Attorney General Marty Jackley and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem in the governor’s race.

The choice for the GOP’s congressional candidate is between former Public Utilities commissioner Dusty Johnson, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio.

While voting in the GOP governor, House and state legislative races is reserved for registered Republicans, all voters are casting ballots on changes to the “Marsy’s Law” victims’ bill of rights.

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11:23 p.m.

Republican primary voters picking a nominee for South Dakota governor also will select a candidate for a statewide congressional seat while joining other residents in weighing changes to the “Marsy’s Law” victims’ bill of rights.

The polls will be open Tuesday from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. local time, with Republicans choosing in their governor primary between Attorney General Marty Jackley and U.S. Rep. Kristi Noem.

Former Public Utilities commissioner Dusty Johnson, Secretary of State Shantel Krebs and state Sen. Neal Tapio are competing to be the GOP’s congressional candidate.

While voting in the GOP governor, House and state legislative races is reserved for registered Republicans, all voters will be able to cast ballots on Constitutional Amendment Y. That measure would tweak Marsy’s Law to cut down on unforeseen problems it has created.

This article originally appeared here via Google News